Detecting Diabetes In A Dog

Detecting Diabetes

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Great New Book


The life of a Diabetic Dog is a true life story as seen from the viewpoint of of a dog who has diabetes!

Amusing, a little eccentric, yet also educational and ideal for children for stories to get them used to the scary world of diabetes in their pet.

The Life Of A Diabetic Dog

Diabetic dogs who get treatment can lead normal lives, normal enough to have families of their own, and this book, with lots of really cute pictures, will show just how content a family can be.

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Diabetic Recipe Book

If your pet is a fussy eater or is bored with the same food day in and day out, it is simple enough to switch brands. But if your pet is also diabetic, this can complicate things enormously.

Dog Recipe Book

This recipe book has been specially compiled and includes alternative recipes which have all been used successfully with diabetic dogs.

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Cheeko, Our Diabetic Dog

Detecting Diabetes in Dogs.

Diabetes in dogs is not uncommon and yet the first time many people are even aware that dogs can suffer from diabetes is when a pet of theirs, or a friend's pet, is diagnosed with diabetes.

Whilst there is no outright cure to diabetes in dogs, it can be controlled and our helpful guides give lots of useful information to help you and your pet to lead a near normal life.

Canine Diabetes Types

There are 3 forms of Canine Diabetes. They are Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetes Insipidus and Canine Gestational Diabetes. Although all three types of Canine Diabetes occur, Diabetes Mellitus is by far the most common. The use of insulin and canine diabetes prescribed food is often the only method available to enable control of your dog's diabetes once the disease has taken hold.

Diabetes Insipidus is an abnormal increase in urine output, fluid intake and often thirst. It causes symptoms such as urinary frequency because the urine output is not concentrated normally and instead of being a yellow color, the urine is pale, colorless or watery in appearance and the measured concentration (osmolality or specific gravity) is low.

Diabetes Insipidus resembles diabetes mellitus because the symptoms of both diseases are increased urination and thirst. However, in every other respect, including the causes and treatment, the diseases are completely unrelated.

Canine Diabetes Mellitus is a disorder in dogs where their bodies are deficient in the production of insulin or insensitive to it. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and helps regulate blood concentrations of glucose. Symptoms of Canine Diabetes Mellitus become worse as the disease progresses so the sooner it is diagnosed the better to avoid complications.

High blood sugar levels (hyperglycemias) develop because the animal’s body is unable to break down and use glucose properly. This inability causes sugar to appear in the urine (glucosuria) that in turn causes an excessive amount of urination (polyuria). To compensate for the increase in urination the dog must drink an excessive amount (polydipsia). Another common side effect of diabetes mellitus is weight loss in a dog despite eating normally or even an increased appetite.

Canine Gestational Diabetes occurs in female dogs during pregnancy when her body does not produce enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it produces correctly. Canine Gestational diabetes has the same symptoms as Canine Diabetes Mellitus.


Diabetes Mellitus Early detection and diagnosis of your dog having diabetes can save you a lot of anguish, not to mention money.

Diabetes mellitus, also known as sugar diabetes, can be a progressive disease, particularly if it is not diagnosed early enough or controlled properly.

The more progressive the diabetes, the more risk there is of complications, like liver and kidney infections or even failure.
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Help My Dog Is Diabetic If you have only recently  discovered that your pet has diabetes and that he or she will need insulin injections every day for the rest of their lives and that YOU HAVE TO ADMINISTER them! – RELAX.

Our Helpful Guides are just what you need to show you exactly what is entailed and offer real practical advice from experts and owners of diabetic pets alike.

Diabetes InsipidusDiabetes Insipidus resembles diabetes mellitus because the symptoms of both diseases are increased urination and thirst. However, in every other respect, including the causes and treatment, the diseases are completely unrelated.

Sometimes diabetes insipidus is referred to as "water" diabetes to distinguish it from the more common diabetes mellitus or "sugar" diabetes.
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I Cannot Inject My Dog. Vets often hear this from their clients, and they will do all that they can to help. Administering insulin is only part of the story. Treatment consists of constant monitoring and diet control in conjunction with insulin.

Our comprehensive guide shows several tips to help you to create a routine and is packed with lots of useful information.

Gestational Diabetes. Canine Gestational Diabetes occurs in a female dog that is pregnant and her body does not produce enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it produces correctly. This diabetes has the same symptoms as Canine Diabetes Mellitus. Treatment is with diet and exercise and/or with insulin injections. Prognosis is very good as this diabetes usually goes away after the dog gives birth.
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Diabetic Dog Treats Vets will recommend that once you dog is diagnosed with diabetes, they should not be given treats. There are no dog treats on the market that are specifically designed for diabetic dogs, but it may still be possible to treat your loved one, although only under strict controls. Our Fact-Sheets contain more information, on what may be safe for your pet.Get our Free Fact-Sheets